AVSPARE.COM
parts catalog

Engine Oil Cooler Inspection, Repair, Testing, and Cleaning {1378} #i01972673 Caterpillar


Usage:

769C 01X  


Caterpillar Products
All Cat Engines

Introduction

Table 1
Revision  Summary of Changes in REHS1758 
09  Combined information from SEBF8077, SEBF8085, SEBF9043, and repaired 52 pixelated illustrations. 
08  Added effectivity and 31 part numbers. 
03 - 07  Added new serial number prefixes. 

© 2018 Caterpillar All Rights Reserved. This guideline is for the use of Cat dealers only. Unauthorized use of this document or the proprietary processes therein without permission may be violation of intellectual property law.

Information contained in this document is considered Caterpillar: Confidential Yellow.

This Reuse and Salvage Guideline contains the necessary information to allow a dealer to establish a parts reusability program. Reuse and salvage information enables Cat dealers and customers to benefit from cost reductions. Every effort has been made to provide the most current information that is known to Caterpillar. Continuing improvement and advancement of product design might have caused changes to your product which are not included in this publication. This Reuse and Salvage Guideline must be used with the latest technical information that is available from Caterpillar.

For technical questions when using this document, work with your Dealer Technical Communicator (TC).

To report suspected errors, inaccuracies, or suggestions regarding the document, submit a form for feedback in the Service Information System (SIS Web) interface.

Canceled Part Numbers and Replaced Part Numbers

This document may not include canceled part numbers and replaced part numbers. Use NPR on SIS for information about canceled part numbers and replaced part numbers. NPR will provide the current part numbers for replaced parts.

Important Safety Information



Illustration 1g02139237

Work safely. Most accidents that involve product operation, maintenance, and repair are caused by failure to observe basic safety rules or precautions. An accident can often be avoided by recognizing potentially hazardous situations before an accident occurs. A person must be alert to potential hazards. This person should also have the necessary training, skills, and tools to perform these functions properly. Safety precautions and warnings are provided in this instruction and on the product. If these hazard warnings are not heeded, bodily injury or death could occur to you or to other persons. Caterpillar cannot anticipate every possible circumstance that might involve a potential hazard. Therefore, the warnings in this publication and the warnings that are on the product are not all inclusive. If a tool, a procedure, a work method, or operating technique that is not recommended by Caterpillar is used, ensure that it is safe for you and for other people to use. Ensure that the product will not be damaged or the product will not be made unsafe by the operation, lubrication, maintenance, or the repair procedures that are used.

------ WARNING! ------

Improper operation, lubrication, maintenance or repair of this product can be dangerous and could result in injury or death.

Do not operate or perform any lubrication, maintenance or repair on this product, until you have read and understood the operation, lubrication, maintenance and repair information.


Safety precautions and warnings are provided in this manual and on the product. If these hazard warnings are not heeded, bodily injury or death could occur to you or to other persons.

The hazards are identified by the safety alert symbol which is followed by a signal word such as danger, warning, or caution. The "WARNING" safety alert symbol is shown below.



Illustration 2g00008666

This safety alert symbol means:

Pay attention!

Become alert!

Your safety is involved.

The message that appears under the safety alert symbol explains the hazard.

Operations that may cause product damage are identified by "NOTICE" labels on the product and in this publication.

Caterpillar cannot anticipate every possible circumstance that might involve a potential hazard. The safety information in this document and the safety information on the machine are not all inclusive. Determine that the tools, procedures, work methods, and operating techniques are safe. Determine that the operation, lubrication, maintenance, and repair procedures will not damage the machine. Also, determine that the operation, lubrication, maintenance, and repair procedures will not make the machine unsafe.

The information, the specifications, and the illustrations that exist in this guideline are based on information which was available at the time of publication. The specifications, torques, pressures, measurements, adjustments, illustrations, and other items can change at any time. These changes can affect the service that is given to the product. Obtain the complete, most current information before you start any job. Caterpillar dealers can supply the most current information.

Summary

Oil coolers can be contaminated with aluminum or steel particles from an engine bearing failure. Historically, most were not used again because there was no reliable way to remove debris trapped on the oil side of the cooler. This guideline has the correct procedure for cleaning engine oil coolers which have been contaminated from engine bearing failures.

This guideline shows visual examples of rubber end sheet oil coolers from Caterpillar equipment. The photographs are of used oil coolers and are included to indicate the conditions that determine if an oil cooler can be reused. This guideline also includes cleaning instruction and recommended cleaning solvents.

Parts that can be used again according to this guideline can be expected to give normal performance until the next overhaul, when used again in the same application.

Examination of rubber end sheet oil coolers will sometimes reveal cosmetic irregularities that do not affect performance. This guideline will help identify which rubber end sheet oil coolers can be returned to service and which must be scrapped or remanufactured. Salvage procedures are also included where applicable.


NOTICE

The flushing procedure in this guideline is for engine oil coolers only. This procedure is not meant to be used on oil coolers made of aluminum (example: Naturally Aspirated (NA) 3204 Engine oil coolers) because the caustic solution will dissolve aluminum. The caustic solution will dissolve only aluminum, so there is no guarantee that other metal particles will be removed from between the oil cooler tubes.


Service Letters and Technical Information Bulletins


NOTICE

The most recent Service Letters and Technical Information Bulletins that are related to this component shall be reviewed before beginning work. Often Service Letters and Technical Information Bulletins contain upgrades in repair procedures, parts, and safety information that pertain to the parts or components being repaired.


References

Table 2
References 
Media Number  Title 
SEBD1101  Service Magazine, "Improvements Made To 5P9718 And 6V186 Disc Pads Used During Gasket Removal" 
, SEBD1323  Service Magazine, "Repair Of Damaged Threads" 
, SEBD6847  Truck Engine News, "A New Valve Bridge Is Available for Certain Truck Engines" 
, SEBF8146  Reuse and Salvage Guideline, "Camshaft inspection Process" 
, SEBF8162  Reuse and Salvage Guideline, "Measuring Procedures and Salvage Procedures for cylinder/">Cylinder Head Assemblies and Related Components" 
, SEBF8187  Reuse and Salvage Guideline, "Standardized Parts Marking Procedures" 
, SMHS6998  Special Instruction, "Instructions for the Use of 5P-6518 Dial indicator Fixture-Parts Reusability" 
, SMHS8438  Special Instruction, "Chart for Heli-Coil Repair" 

Replacement Parts

Consult the applicable Parts Identification manual for your engine.

------ WARNING! ------

When replacement parts are required for this product Caterpillar recommends using Caterpillar replacement parts or parts with equivalent specifications including, but not limited to, physical dimensions, type, strength and material.

Failure to heed this warning can lead to premature failures, product damage, personal injury or death.


Tooling and Equipment


NOTICE

Failure to follow the recommended procedure or the specified tooling that is required for the procedure could result in damage to components.

To avoid component damage, follow the recommended procedure using the recommended tools.


Table 3
Part Number  Description 
1P-3047  Tap Handle 
1U-7434  37/64 inch drill 
2P-5533  3/8 inch NPT Tap 
2S-1641  Screen Tube Assembly 
3S-3875  Suction Screen 
4J-5267  Seal O-ring 
4C-7159  Fitting 
5C-7261  Nut 
5P-3413  Pipe Sealant 
5P-9709  Abrasive Disc 
5P-9718  Abrasive Disc 
6E-2313  Cover 
6V-3940  Bolt 
6V-0185  Abrasive Disc 
6V-0186  Abrasive Disc 
7M-7456  Bearing Mount Compound 
9M-1974  Washer 
210-6990  Digital Gauge 
242-7135  Oil Cooler Test Group 

Table 4
Covers and Seals 
Reference Number  Plate
Part Number 
Seal
Part Number 
242-7125  1P-3708 
242-7126  1P-3708 
242-7127  1P-3704 
242-7128  1P-3704 
242-7129  8T-2885 
242-7130  8T-2885 
244-2667  1P-3703 
244-2668  1P-3703 

Table 5
Plate to Oil Cooler
Cross Reference 
Oil Cooler
Part Number 
Plate
Reference Number(1) 
New  REMAN 
1W-0156  0R-3745  1 and 2 
1W-5200  0R-5546  5 and 6 
2W-9978  0R-5515  3 and 4 
4P-1661  0R-3330  1 and 2 
4P-3754  0R-3724  3 and 4 
4P-5884  0R-3812  1 and 2 
4P-7731  0R-3378  1 and 2 
4W-0419  0R-5529  1 and 2 
4W-4980  0R-5519  5 and 6 
4W-5056  0R-5517  3 and 4 
4W-5363  0R-5538  3 and 4 
4W-5405  0R-5544  5 and 6 
4W-5412  0R-5531  1 and 2 
4W-5475  0R-5553  1 and 2 
4W-7188  0R-3334  3 and 4 
4W-7382  0R-5536  1 and 2 
4W-9822  0R-5549  1 and 2 
7C-0145  0R-5513  1 and 2 
7C-3039  0R-5511  1 and 2 
7C-6461  0R-3336  1 and 2 
7C-8858  0R-3336  1 and 2 
7E-2660  0R-3361  1 and 2 
7N-0110  0R-3501 
7N-0165  0R-3499 
7W-0205  0R-5525  1 and 2 
7W-0675  0R-5547  1 and 2 
7W-1713  0R-3344  1 and 2 
7W-2164  0R-5601  1 and 2 
7W-6459  0R-3366  1 and 2 
104-1817  N/A  1 and 2 
104-6220  N/A  1 and 2 
105-8651  0R-3708  1 and 2 
115-4517  0R-8191  3 and 4 
122-9934  0R-9575  1 and 2 
124-5142  0R-8316  5 and 6 
127-5537  0R-8402  3 and 4 
131-7806  N/A  1 and 2 
133-0125  0R-9056  1 and 2 
136-7314  N/A  1 and 2 
137-8480  N/A  1 and 2 
141-4107  0R-8528  1 and 2 
141-4108  0R-8529  1 and 2 
141-4109  0R-8530,
10R-0817 
1 and 2 
155-1216  N/A  1 and 2 
165-9776  10R-5664  1 and 6 
190-3835  N/A  3 and 4 
191-4450  N/A 
191-9336  10R-6348  1 and 6 
200-5972  0R-0816  1 and 2 
200-5975  10R-0817  1 and 2 
223-7962  10R-2112  1 and 2 
231-2758  N/A  1 and 2 
236-8745  10R-2128  1 and 2 
245-6438  10R-9045  5 and 6 
307-1981  N/A  1 and 6 
311-7792  20R-2811  5 and 6 
311-7795  20R-2812  1 and 6 
317-2276  N/A  1 and 6 
355-1647,
491-0365 
N/A  5 and 6 
359-1625  20R-0996  1 and 2 
373-6537  10R-5667  1 and 6 
379-3436  20R-1861  1 and 2 
382-3104  N/A  1 and 6 
473-9706,
491-0366 
N/A  5 and 6 
478-7502  N/A  1 and 6 
479-1945  N/A  1 and 6 
(1) Refer to Table 4 to match the Reference Numbers to the proper Part Number for the Plate and the Seal .

General Recommendations

Steel and cast iron particles can get trapped in the cooler core. Caterpillar recommends discarding the oil cooler if steel particles are found in the oil filter/">filter, or if you suspect that large steel (or cast iron) particles have contaminated the core. A large particle is any particle over 0.70 mm (0.028 inch). Large deposits (caking) of aluminum at the oil cooler inlet port indicate that a bearing failure may have also caused steel debris from the steel backs of the bearings or the crankshaft to become deposited in the cooler core. If an oil cooler core has these deposits, do not use the core again.

Visual Inspection and Repair



Illustration 3g06279911
Nomenclature
(1) Water Inlet
(2) Water Outlet
(3) Engine Oil Inlet
(4) Engine Oil Outlet

Coolers with obvious damage to the end plates or main casting should not be used again. Do not try to repair broken, cracked, or dented castings. Make sure that tubes do not have loosened or broken joints, because these tubes can leak later.



Illustration 4g06279913
Cracked or broken oil cooler castings should not be repaired.
Do not use again


Illustration 5g06279916
Cracked or broken oil cooler castings should not be repaired.
Do not use again


Illustration 6g06279917
Broken ear on the tube mounting flange.
Use again - after welding the ear and machining the hole.

Sometimes, the flange ear, as shown in Illustration 6, can be welded and repaired. The hole will need to be machined again. Only personnel with the experience of welding on cast iron should attempt this repair. Use care during welding not to damage or overheat the brazed joints, end plates, baffles, or tubes.

Stripped threads in the hole can be repaired with a Caterpillar threaded insert or by installing a steel plug and machining the hole again. For more information on threaded inserts, refer to the Special Instruction, SMHS8438, "Chart for Heli-Coil Repair". The procedure for installing plugs to repair stripped threads is in Service Magazine, SEBD1323, "Repair Of Damaged Threads" which can be found on SIS Web, and/or micro-fiche.



Illustration 7g06279919
Stripped thread in the mounting flange.
Use again - after salvage. This area can be welded.

Any oil cooler that has obvious physical damage to the tubes or the end plates should not be repaired or used again. Oil coolers that are damaged in this way can leak later, and it is not practical to repair the cooler.


NOTICE

Most physical damage is caused by improper handling of the oil cooler during disassembly, cleaning, and handling. Handle oil coolers with care because the copper tubes and end plates are not protected when the end housings are not installed.




Illustration 8g06279921
Physical damage to the tubes.
Do not use again


Illustration 9g06279923
Physical damage to the end plate.
Do not use again

Visual Inspection for 3044, 3046, and 3066 Engines

Inspect the oil coolers for signs of obvious damage. If there are signs of obvious damage, replace the oil cooler.



Illustration 10g01217294
Important areas of the oil cooler for inspection

Inspect the seams of the oil cooler. If there is any sign of a leak, replace the oil cooler. Refer to Illustration 10.

Only personnel with the appropriate skill and experience should attempt repairs to oil coolers. Repairs could include cooler leaks, damaged mounting studs, broken mounting studs, damaged mounting flanges, or broken mounting flanges.

Do not reuse a cooler when the mounting flanges do not fit square with the oil cooler cover.

General Cleaning

Incorrect cleaning solutions and flushing solvents can damage the baffle plates in an end sheet oil cooler. The most common ways of cleaning oil coolers are the use of steam cleaners and caustic solutions.

If outside vendors are cleaning and flushing oil coolers, check the type of solvent being used in the cleaning process. All cleaning solutions and flushing solvents must meet the specifications listed below.

Normal hot caustic solutions on "boil out" tanks are acceptable and do not affect the materials in the coolers. Oakite and Magnus brand caustic solutions have been tested and do not damage any parts inside the cooler. After the cooler has been cleaned, the caustic solutions must be flushed out with suitable solvents.

Caterpillar recommends using only solvents from the mineral spirits family. Stanisol is an acceptable mineral spirits solvent. Use the solvents only as long as is needed.

The following methods can be used to clean oil coolers. All coolers must be rinsed regardless of the process for cleaning.

  • Flushing

  • Agitation

  • Ultrasonic

Note: Oil coolers that are suspected of being difficult to clean can be cleaned in a tank that provides an agitation or an ultrasonic tank.

Note: Ensure that the deposits that are formed from antifreeze are removed.


NOTICE

The exterior of the oil cooler can be cleaned with steam.

Do not steam-clean the inside the oil cooler. Never insert any object or steam wand inside any oil cooler opening. Baffle damage and/or tube wear could result.

Do not use chlorinated solvents on oil coolers with a rubber end sheet construction. Use only caustic solutions and solvents which belong to the mineral spirits family.

Do not leave the oil ports exposed because additional debris can enter the oil cooler. Cover the oil cooler with plastic plugs between operations.


  1. Some oil coolers do not need the entire cleaning procedure. If the engine has not had a bearing failure, the oil cooler will not need a specialized cleaning. Refer to the standard cleaning procedure.

  2. Oil coolers from engines that have visible evidence of a bearing failure should be flushed completely. The procedure for flushing the oil cooler is listed later in this guideline.

  3. Oil coolers from engines that have had a major bearing failure, should not be cleaned or reused. Major bearing failure results in iron or copper particles imbedded in the coolers.

  4. After being flushed with a solvent, flush the oil cooler with clean water. Use compressed air to dry the oil coolers, and apply a rust preventive if the oil cooler is not installed immediately.

How to Remove Old Gasket Material

Remove old gaskets from the flange mounting surfaces by any acceptable method. Refer to the Service Magazine, "Improvements Made To 5P-9718 And 6V-0186 Disc Pads Used During Gasket Removal". Remove as much of the gasket material as possible before the oil cooler is agitated and flushed. If necessary, remove the final parts of gasket material after the oil cooler has gone through the rough caustic stage of cleaning. The oil cooler and gasket material will still be hot. Do not put gasket material into the final caustic flush tank.

How to Clean Copper Tubes

Engine Coolant Side Cleaning

Clean the copper tubes by running a rod through the tubes, if necessary. Clean the tubes using this method before soaking, flushing, or pressure testing the cooler. Using this procedure will possibly break brazed joints, so pressure-test the tubes afterwards to find any leaks. Tubes in oil coolers constructed with rubber end sheets can also be cleaned with a rod.



Illustration 11g06279926
Use a rod to clean cooling system deposits from inside cooler tubes. Do this operation before soaking, flushing, or pressure testing the tubes.

Standard Cleaning

Oil coolers from engines that have not had a bearing failure, only normal bearing wear, can be cleaned using the standard cleaning procedure. Standard cleaning includes using mineral-based cleaning solutions and simple flushing procedures. The solution must be kept clean and be replaced regularly. The flushing stand must have a filter/">filter. Details on filter requirements are listed under equipment requirements for a caustic flushing stand.


NOTICE

The standard cleaning method is used by many dealers to clean engine oil coolers. However, the standard cleaning method is not adequate to clean an oil cooler which has visible particles of aluminum from a bearing failure. If it is suspected that there is aluminum in the cooler, Caterpillar's recommendation is that you perform the entire flushing procedure.


Flushing Aluminum Particles from Oil Side of Oil Cooler

Synopsis of Flushing Procedure

The first step in the flushing procedure is to circulate a strong caustic (detergent) solution through the dirty or contaminated oil cooler. This is done in a cleaning tank of caustic cleaner.

Next, coolers are put in a final flushing stand which is filled with clean caustic solution. Then, clean water is used to flush the caustic solution.

Finally, coolers are pressure tested. Coolers that fail the pressure test should be recleaned and retested after the leaks in the tubes are blocked. After passing the pressure test, coolers are installed on an engine. If the coolers are going into inventory, the coolers are coated with or dipped in corrosion preventive and shrink-wrapped to prevent rust.

Equipment Requirements

Caustic Tank

Put the hot caustic solution into a large Aga Lif tank, or similar brand, that will not be damaged by the solution. For most caustic solutions, aMagnus Aga Lif stainless steel cleaning tank is recommended with a 948.0 L (250.5 US gal) capacity. The tank must be an agitating type with 305 mm (12.0 inch) minimum stroke. Oil coolers must sit on a rack at a 15 degree angle and never rest on the bottom of the tank.

Caustic Flushing Stand

The flushing stand should be insulated, or have some form of heat retention. Oil coolers must be flushed for 30 minutes in both directions with the caustic solution. Make sure that the stand can hold and flush the oil cooler so the technician is free to do other work. A flushing stand can be used for all types of oil coolers. A flushing stand can also flush transmission and hydraulic oil coolers if the coolers are not contaminated with large copper or steel debris exceeding 2.00 mm (0.079 inch).



Illustration 12g06279927
Use rubber straps or other similar clamps to hold the oil cooler, while the cooler is being flushed.

The stand should be long enough to hold the longest Caterpillar oil cooler on a 3500 Engine which is 1092 mm (43.0 in). The pressurized solvent is fed to the oil cooler by a pipe with a cone-shaped inlet adapter. Different cone-shaped adapters can be machined from mild steel. Put some threads on the large end to fit the solvent supply pipe. The adapters must not contact the copper tubes inside the oil cooler. Pressure test oil cooler adapters can be bolted to the supply end of the cooler instead of using cone-shaped adapters. Cut the bed screen so there is still the proper clearance for pipes, adapter changes and stand cleaning.



Illustration 13g06279929
Cone-shaped inlet line for flushing the oil cooler with solvent.


Illustration 14g06279930
2S-1641 Screen Tube Assembly


Illustration 15g06279932
3S-3875 Suction Screen

The flushing stand must be equipped with a magnetic filtration cartridge and an in-line immersion heater to maintain the temperature at 82 °C (180 °F) minimum.

Use a 2S-1641 Screen Tube Assembly (magnetic screen) with a 3S-3875 Suction Screen. Install a 88.2 mm (3.47 inch) inside diameter pipe before the pump. Install shutoff valves before and after the magnetic screen. Shutoff valves will enable you to change the screen without draining the tank.

Install a pump with a capacity of at least 132.0 L/min (34.9 US gpm) to circulate the caustic solution through the oil cooler. Some pump seals can be damaged by the caustic solution used to flush oil coolers. Make sure the type of caustic solution being used is specified when ordering the pump.

Change the solvent and clean the magnetic screens after 40 to 45 coolers are cleaned, at least once a week. Regular changing of solution is critical to ensure proper cleanliness of the oil coolers.

The clean caustic solution should be routed so flow runs through the oil cooler and drains into the bottom of the flushing stand through the heater, magnetic cartridge, and back to the pump.

Caustic Cleaning Solutions

------ WARNING! ------

Personal injury can result from working with cleaning solvent.

Because of the volatile nature of many cleaning solvents, extreme caution must be exercised when using them. If unsure about a particular cleaning fluid, refer to the manufacturer's instructions and directions.

Always wear protective clothing and eye protection when working with cleaning solvents.


When an oil cooler is contaminated with aluminum, the oil cooler must be agitated in a caustic solution that dissolves only aluminum, and not copper, or any other metal used in the cooler construction of the cooler. Most “hot caustic” solutions will chemically react with, and dissolve, aluminum. Some might react with other metals used in manufacturing the cooler. Discuss the solution being used with the chemical supplier before attempting to use the solution on the oil cooler.

Use a chemically strong, liquid alkaline cleaner that removes dirt, oil, grease, paint, rust, varnish, ink, carbon deposits, and aluminum from ferrous parts.

Change the solution every 90 days or after 75 oil coolers have been cleaned (whichever comes first). Do not put any parts made of aluminum, or with an obvious collection of aluminum particles, into the cleaning solution. Large amounts of aluminum in this solution will cause contamination and reduce the cleaning effect of the solution.

The caustic solution should be heated to a minimum of 82 °C (180 °F).

Agitating Cleaning Tanks

Agitating cleaning tanks accelerate the chemical cleaning process by mechanically swirling solution around the parts causing turbulent flow to impact all surfaces. Agitating cleaning tanks are available from:

Ultrasonic

Ultrasonic cleaning is accomplished with the use of ultrahigh frequency sound waves in the appropriate cleaning solution in order to generate millions of small bubbles to form and these small bubbles collapse at a high rate of speed on the part that is being cleaned. Sources of supply are available for ultrasonic cleaning equipment. Check with the manufacturer of the tank for suggestions on chemical solutions and the compatibility with cleaning solutions.

Cleaning Procedure

Use the following procedure to clean the engine oil coolers:



    Illustration 16g06279934

  1. Put the oil coolers in an agitating caustic tank with the oil ports down. Agitate the oil coolers in the tank of hot caustic solution for at least 4 hours. Place the oil coolers at a 15 degree angle and turn the cooler(end for end) every 2 hours so the low port changes. If the cooler has obvious aluminum contamination, agitate the cooler for 6 to 8 hours. Change the low end every 2 hours. Agitate the coolers for the minimum time required to get a clean reading as outlined in the section “Quality Control Measures” later in this guide.


    Illustration 17g06279935

  2. After agitation, put the oil cooler on a flushing stand. The flushing stand should be filled with the same caustic solution as the agitation tank. The stand must have a magnetic filtration cartridge and a flow rate of 132 L/min (35 US gpm), at a constant minimum temperature of 82 °C (180 ° F). Flushing the oil cooler a second time with clean caustic solution will remove additional aluminum or debris loosened during the agitation stage. Flush the oil cooler in each direction for 30 minutes.


    Illustration 18g06279941
    With the oil cooler vertical, flush each port with water for 15 minutes.
    (3) Water inlet
    (4) Water outlet
    (5) Water inlet
    (6) Water outlet


    Illustration 19g06279942
    Oil cooler being flushed vertically.


    Illustration 20g06279943
    With the oil cooler horizontal, flush each port with water for 15 minutes. Total time for flushing the oil cooler with water should be 60 minutes.
    (7) Water outlet
    (8) Water inlet
    (9) Water inlet
    (10) Water outlet


    Illustration 21g06279944
    Oil cooler being flushed horizontally.

  3. Flush the oil cooler with water to remove any excess caustic solution. Flushing reduces contamination of the pressure testing tank.

    1. Flush water through the inside of the oil cooler for 15 minutes with the oil cooler vertical. Refer to Illustrations 18 and 19.

    2. Flush water through the oil cooler for 15 minutes with the oil cooler horizontal. Refer to Illustrations 20 and 21. Steps 3.a and 3.b should be done for every port for a total of 60 minutes.

    3. Use leak test fixtures with a 25 mm (1.0 in) water hose for maximum water flow and better flushing. Refer to the section on “Tools for Pressure Testing”.

Note: An oil cooler which is not flushed with water for the correct time period will only be partially clean. Water used for flushing must be clean because it can affect the test method for checking the cleanliness of the oil cooler.

Visual Inspection for Rubber End Sheet Oil Coolers

Normal Rubber End Sheet

Most of the rubber end sheet oil coolers inspected will fall into this category. The most noticeable difference between new and used end sheets is that the used end sheet exhibits some softening. These oil coolers can be returned to service as is.



Illustration 22g06279946
Rubber end sheet oil cooler - Normal condition. The cooler is an earlier model with tube ends almost flush with the end sheet.

Use again



Illustration 23g06279952
Rubber end sheet oil cooler - Normal condition. The extension of the tubes beyond the end sheet indicates that the cooler is a newer model.

Use again

Blistering

This condition is the most common surface blemish leading to the scrapping of oil coolers that could be salvaged. Blistering is characterized by a bubbling appearance often with loose flaps of rubber. The blisters form when water is absorbed into the rubber at elevated temperatures. The tube ends are closer to the rubber end sheet in early production oil coolers and are more likely to show blistering.

An oil cooler showing blistering can be reused after loose rubber is removed with a wire brush or wire wheel. Removal of the loose material prevents tube blockage.



Illustration 24g06279953
Blistering

Use again

After removing loose rubber with a wire brush or wire wheel.



Illustration 25g06279955
Another example of blistering

Use again

After removing loose rubber with a wire brush or wire wheel.

Wrinkling

Early production methods sometimes caused this minor blemish. A wrinkle will sometimes appear where the end sheet meets the housing/">housing. A wrinkled end sheet will not affect the performance or life of an oil cooler.



Illustration 26g06279957
Wrinkling

Use again

Chipping

Chipping, sometimes called "chunking", is a surface condition where sections of rubber material are loose or missing. Dimensional and pressures checks must be made on an oil cooler with this condition to determine if the oil cooler can be reused. The dimensional check consists of measurement of the void in the rubber end sheet. No missing section can be longer than 19.0 mm (0.75 inch) or deeper than 3.8 mm (0.15 inch). If either of these dimensions is exceeded, the oil cooler should not be reused. If the end sheet passes the dimensional checks, the oil cooler must be pressure tested. The oil cooler must pass the leak check at 795 kPa (115 psi) before the oil cooler can be returned to service.



Illustration 27g06279959
Chipping

Use again

After meeting reuse criteria for maximum void size and pressure test.

Baffle Check Procedure

Internal baffles can break or come loose and move downstream along the tubes. The outermost baffles are mounted within 25 mm (1.0 inch) of the oil ports (inlet and outlet). The baffles are semicircular and are mounted internally in a staggered pattern to route the oil for efficient cooling. To check for baffle breakage or movement, make a wire inspection tool from stiff wire. The wire should be bent at 90 degrees to form one leg 38 mm (1.5 inch) long. Stick the wire into the oil port and move the wire along the core downstream from the port. The wire should hit the baffle. If the wire will move into the cooler until the bend in the wire prevents the wire from moving further, there has been a baffle failure. There are no voids in a good baffle that would allow the wire to pass through. Do not reuse an oil cooler with a broken or dislocated baffle.



Illustration 28g06279962
Checking for baffle breakage or dislocation.
(1) Wire inspection tool

Pressure Testing

Tooling



Illustration 29g06279963
C-clamps for pressure testing oil coolers. The bottom clamp has a quick disconnect air fitting. The dimensions for the rubber seals are shown in Illustration 30.

Two large C-clamps can be modified to check the pressure of engine oil coolers. Refer to Illustration 29. C-clamps will fit almost all Caterpillar engine oil coolers that have a tube bundle type of construction. Using C-clamps will eliminate the need to make dozens of different adapter plates. The C-clamps should open at least 300 mm (11.8 inch).



    Illustration 30g06279966
    Construction dimensions for vee blocks made from SAE 1020 steel.
    (A) 76.2 mm (3.00 inch)
    (B) 23.9 mm (0.94 inch)
    (C) 31.8 mm (1.25 inch)
    (D) 20 degrees

  1. Make two Vee blocks and weld the vee blocks to the stationary ends of the C-clamps.


    Illustration 31g06279968
    Dimensions for fabricating the rubber seals for the C-clamps. Only one seal has a hole.
    (E) 19.0 mm (0.75 inch)
    (F) 76.2 mm (3.00 inch)
    (G) 19.0 mm (0.75 inch) diameter hole in one seal only.


    Illustration 32g06279969
    Dimensions for machining the SAE 1020 steel adapter for the C-clamp.
    (11) Rubber seal
    (12) Adapter
    (H) 19.05 mm (0.750 inch)
    (J) 12.7 mm (0.50 inch)
    (K) 76.2 mm (3.00 inch)
    (L) 88.9 mm (3.50 inch)
    (M) 1.5 mm (0.06 inch) * 45 degrees, both sides.

  2. Make two rubber seals for the C-clamps. These seals are identical, except one seal has a hole. Cut the seals from sheets of rubber or pieces of conveyer belt material. Be sure to make extra seals. To order rubber sheets contact:


    Illustration 33g06279971
    Dimensions for fabricating the inlet adapter made from SAE 1020 steel.
    (13) Screw
    (14) 6.4 mm (0.25 inch) pipe nipple 36.5 mm (1.44 inch) long.
    (15) Adapter
    (16) Rubber seal
    (N) 38.1 mm (1.50 inch)
    (P) 12.7 mm (0.50 inch)
    (R) 11.10 mm (0.437 inch) diameter 16.5 mm (0.65 inch) deep 1/4-18 NPTF thread.
    (S) 76.2 mm (3.00 inch)
    (T) 88.9 mm (3.50 inch)
    (U) 11.10 mm (0.437 inch) diameter 20.3 mm (0.80 inch) deep 1/4-18 NPTF thread.
    (V) 1.5 mm (0.06 inch) * 45 degrees, both sides.

  3. Fabricate an inlet adapter and weld the adapter to the second C-clamp.

Procedure

Engine oil coolers can be tested in water that is room temperature or in hot water (near the boiling point). Caterpillar recommends that oil coolers be tested at room temperature, 16 to 33 °C (61 to 91 °F). Hot testing is more dangerous and not necessary if the correct procedure is followed.

For more information, refer to the section “Tools for Pressure Testing” in this guideline .

  1. Clean the oil cooler thoroughly before pressure testing. Flush the oil cooler with solvent and then water. Check the oil cooler for obvious physical damage.


    Illustration 34g06279972
    Modified C-clamps are used to block the inlet or outlet ports.
    (17) C-clamp
    (18) C-clamp
    (19) Quick disconnect

  2. Block the inlet or outlet port on the oil side of the cooler with a plate or clamp (17). Refer to Illustration 34.


    Illustration 35g06279973
    Special plates can be used to block the ports, but many different sizes will be needed. These plates are also used in the water flushing procedure.

  3. Install an adapter plate or clamp to the other port so pressure air can be put into the cooler. Refer to Illustrations 34 and 35.

  4. After the adapter plates or clamps have been installed, put the oil cooler core into a tank of water. The cooler must be submerged, but still close to the surface to allow any air bubbles to be seen. Use a rack that slopes downward in the tank so that different diameters and lengths of oil coolers can be tested without changing the water level.


    NOTICE

    Air pressure must not exceed 795 kPa (115 psi) for any Caterpillar engine oil cooler. Higher pressure can damage the oil cooler core.


  5. Apply air pressure of 690 to 760 kPa (100 to 110 psi) to the oil cooler.


    Illustration 36g06279975
    Oil cooler core in tank of water. Bubbles indicate a leak. Repair the leak and test again.

  6. Agitate the oil cooler at first to help remove air from inside the tubes to prevent false indications of leaks. Keep the oil cooler in the water, with the air pressure on, for at least 10 minutes before looking for leaks. Wait for the bubbles, which occur naturally when you put the cooler core in the tank, to disappear before looking for leaks. Repair the large leaks first, so small leaks can be found.

Test Procedures for Brazed and Rubber End Sheet Oil Coolers

Procedure to Fabricate Adapters for the Oil Ports



Illustration 37g06279977

Note: Adapters can be fabricated from the covers that are listed in Table 5. Refer to Table 5 for the proper measurements. Adapters that are listed without part numbers can be fabricated from plate steel.

Perform the following procedure to fabricate an adapter that is to be used on the oil port of the oil cooler.

  1. Drill a hole in the center of the cover at location (C).

  2. Thread the hole that had been drilled to accept a coupler.

  3. Apply 5P-3413 Pipe Sealant to the threads of the coupler and securely thread the coupler into the cover.


Illustration 38g01030941
Type 1


Illustration 39g01030942
Type 2


Illustration 40g01030944
Type 3


Illustration 41g06279979
Type 4


Illustration 42g06279980
Type 5


Illustration 43g06279981
Type 6

Table 6
Cover
Measurements 
Type  Part Number  Dimensions 
A A1 A2  A3  B  B1 
1(1)  5H-4017  30.16 mm (1.1874 inch)  N/A  N/A  N/A  17.18 mm (0.6764 inch)  N/A 
1(1)  5H-4019  44.45 mm (1.7500 inch)  N/A  N/A  N/A  31.45 mm (1.2382 inch)  N/A 
1(1)  5H-4020  50.80 mm (2.0000 inch)  N/A  N/A  N/A  36.23 mm (1.4264 inch)  N/A 
1(1)  2J-2668  60.32 mm (2.3748 inch)  N/A  N/A  N/A  45.68 mm (1.7984 inch)  N/A 
1(1)  2J-5608  71.44 mm (2.8126 inch)  N/A  N/A  N/A  55.20 mm (2.1732 inch)  N/A 
100-8521  75.04 mm (2.9543 inch)  N/A  N/A  N/A  34.65 mm (1.3642 inch)  N/A 
4P-2251  89.00 mm (3.5039 inch)  N/A  N/A  N/A  55.20 mm (2.1732 inch)  N/A 
5D-6176  69.84 mm (2.7496 inch)  35.72 mm (1.4063 inch)  N/A  N/A  37.80 mm (1.4882 inch)  N/A 
3J-2903  77.78 mm (3.0622 inch)  42.88 mm (1.6882 inch)  N/A  N/A  55.20 mm (2.1732 inch)  N/A 
3J-7479  52.38 mm (2.0622 inch)  26.19 mm (1.0311 inch)  N/A  N/A  29.88 mm (1.1764 inch)  N/A 
(2)  115.00 mm (4.5276 inch)  74.00 mm (2.9134 inch)  38.00 mm (1.4961 inch)  N/A  28.54 mm (1.1236 inch)  4.78 mm (0.1882 inch)(3) 
(2)  50.80 mm (2.0000 inch)  136.65 mm (5.3799 inch)  19.05 mm (0.7500 inch)  98.55 mm (3.8799 inch)  28.54 mm (1.1236 inch)  4.78 mm (0.1882 inch)(3) 
(2)  94.00 mm (3.7008 inch)  72.00 mm (2.8346 inch)  36.00 mm (1.4173 inch)  N/A  72.99 mm (2.8736 inch)  4.78 mm (0.1882 inch)(3) 
(1) The covers are secured to the oil cooler with a flange half. Refer to Table 7 for the proper flange half and seal.
(2) Fabricate covers from plate steel that is 12.7 mm (0.5000 inch) thick.
(3) Do not exceed a depth of 4.00 mm (0.1575 inch).

Table 7
Cover, Seal, and Flange Half to Oil Cooler
Cross Reference 
Cover  Seal  Flange Half  Oil Cooler 
5H-4017  4J-5267  1P-4576  7N-0110, 7W-1713 
5H-4019  4J-0520  8C-3206  2W-9978 
5H-4020  4J-0520  1P-4578  4W-5056, 4W-5363 
2J-2668  4J-0524  1P-4579  4W-7382, 4W-9822, 137-8480, 155-1216 
2J-5608  4J-0527  1P-4582  4W-0419 
100-8521  6V-5266  N/A  4P-3754, 115-4517 
4P-2251  5P-5846 or 6V-5266  N/A  4P-7731, 7E-2660, 236-8745, 359-1625, 379-3436 
5D-6176  6V-4368  N/A  1W-0156, 104-6220, 105-8651, 133-0125, 223-7962, 231-2758
3J-2903  4J-0519  N/A  104-1817, 4P-1661, 4P-5884, 4W-5412, 4W-5475, 7C-0145, 7W-0205, 7C-3039, 7C-6461, 7C-8858, 7W-0675, 7W-1713, 7W-2164, 7W-6459, 122-9934, 131-7806, 136-7314, 141-4107, 141-4108, 141-4109, 200-5972, 200-5975, 307-1981, 317-2276 
3J-7479  6V-4368  N/A  4W-7188, 190-3835, 127-5537 
Type 4  1P-3703  N/A  4W-4980, 4W-5405, 124-5142, 165-9776, 191-9336, 245-6438, 311-7792, 311-7795, 355-1647, 373-6537, 382-3104, 473-9706, 478-7502, 479-1945 
Type 5  1P-3703  N/A  7N-0165, 191-4450 
Type 6  8T-2885  N/A  1W-5200 

Testing

Note: Test fittings, seals, and hoses that are free of leaks are important to the validity and the repeatability of this test.



    Illustration 44g01030912

  1. Securely attach the adapters to the oil ports of the oil cooler. Refer to Table 5 for the correct adapter.


    Illustration 45g01030927

  2. Attach the air supply hose to the adapter.


    Illustration 46g01030933

  3. Pressurize the oil cooler with a minimum of 586.1 kPa (85 psi), but not more than 792.9 kPa (115 psi) of air pressure. Perform the following:

    Note: Use the form at the end of the publication to record the results of the test.

    1. Shut off the incoming air pressure and record the static air pressure.

    2. Start a timer that is set for 3 minutes. The pressure should be sustained for a minimum of 3 minutes.

    3. Observe the amount of air pressure that is indicated on the gauge at the end of 3 minutes.

    4. A loss of 2.1 kPa (0.3 psi) or more within 3 minutes indicates a leaking oil cooler. Record the amount of air pressure that was lost.

    5. No pressure loss indicates an oil cooler that is serviceable. Go to Step 6 for additional information.

    6. Perform either Step 4 or Step 5 to identify the source of the leakage.


    Illustration 47g01030937

  4. While the oil cooler is still pressurized, submerge the oil cooler in water that is at ambient temperature.

    1. Allow the oil cooler to settle in order for the air that is trapped to escape.

    2. Observe the oil cooler for continuous air bubbles that indicate a leak.

    3. Note the location or the origin of the leak. Record this information.


    Illustration 48g01030939

  5. While the oil cooler is still pressurized, use a soap solution to aid in finding the slow leaks.

    1. Spray the oil cooler with the soap solution.

    2. Observe the oil cooler for the formation of bubbles, which indicate a leak.

    3. Note the location or the origin of the leak. Record this information.

  6. If the oil cooler does not leak, the problem may be elsewhere in the cooling system or the engine. Refer to the appropriate service manual to check for leakage in the following areas:

    • Faulty head gasket or water seals

    • Cracked cylinder head

    • Cracked cylinder block

    • Cracked cylinder liner

    • Faulty cylinder liner seal

    • Faulty air compressor

    • Faulty water pump seal

    • Faulty aftercooler or faulty intercooler

    • Cracked turbocharger housing that is water cooled

    • Cracked exhaust manifold that is water cooled


Illustration 49g06279982

Test Procedures for 3044, 3046, and 3066 Engines

Pressure Fittings

The 242-7135 Oil Cooler Tester is a kit that contains the necessary tooling in order to pressure test oil coolers except the hardware that facilitates pressurizing the oil cooler. Two covers or two adapter plates must be fabricated in order to properly pressure test the oil cooler. One cover or one adapter plate will seal the port for the oil cooler on one end and the other cover or the other adapter plate will be for sealing the other port and providing a connection for the Oil Cooler Tester and a source of compressed air.

Note: The structural steel that is used to fabricate the covers or the adapter plates must have yield strength that is a minimum of 290 MPa (42,000 psi) and the structural steel must meet the specifications for ASTM A1011 that is grade 45.

Fittings for the 3044, 3064 and 3066 Engines



Illustration 50g06279983
(A) 12 mm (0.47 inch) holes
(B) 54 mm (2.126 inch)
(C) 31.75 ± 0.13 mm (1.2500 ± 0.0051 inch)
(D) 3/8-18 NPTF
(E) 15.0 ± 1.5 mm (0.5906 ± 0.0591 inch)
(F) 4.11 ± 0.13 mm (0.162 ± 0.005 inch)
(G) 2.84 ± 0.13 mm (0.1128 ± 0.005 inch)

Use the dimensions that are specified in Illustration 50 to modify the covers.

  1. Source two 6E-2313 Cover which have O-ring seal grooves.

  2. Drill the two existing holes to 12 mm (0.47 inch). See callout (A).

    Note: Drill out the existing holes for both of the 6E-2313 Cover.

  3. Drill a hole that is 14.9123 mm (0.5871 inch) in diameter in the center of one of the 6E-2313 cover with the use of a 1U-7434 drill bit. Tap the hole with a 2P-5533 tap for the 4C-7159 Fitting. See callout (D).

    Note: One of the 6E-2313 Cover should not include the drilled hole and the tapped hole.

  4. Apply 5P-3413 Pipe Sealant to the threads of 4C-7159 Fitting and install the fitting into the cover that has been drilled and tapped. Tighten the fitting to 35 N·m (26 lb ft).

    Note: Use only enough pipe sealant to seal the threads as excessive sealant could contaminate the oil cooler.

  5. Use two 4J-5267 Seal O-ring in order to seal the two 6E-2313 cover to the oil cooler.

  6. Proceed to the "Pressure Testing" section.

Table 8
Parts For Pressurizing Oil Coolers
3044, 3064 and 3066 engines 
Part Number  Description  Quantity 
6E-2313  Cover 
4J-5267  Seal O-ring 
5P-7970  Nut 
9M-1974  Washer 
4C-7159  Fitting 
2P-5533  3/8 inch NPTF Tap 
1P-3047  Tap Handle 
1U-7434  37/64 inch drill 

Fittings for the 3046 engine



Illustration 51g06279984
Flanges that mount the oil cooler


Illustration 52g06279985
(H) 15.0 ± 1.5 mm (0.59 ± 0.059 inch)
(I) 31.75 ± 0.13 mm (1.2500 ± 0.0051 inch)
(J) 12 mm (0.47 inch) holes
(K) 64.0 mm (2.52 inch)
(L) 3/8-18 NPTF
(M) 2.84 ± 0.13 mm (0.1128 ± 0.005 inch)
(N) 4.11 ± 0.13 mm (0.162 ± 0.005 inch)
(O) 0.8 ± 0.2 mm (0.032 ± 0.008 inch) corner radius

Use the mounting flanges on the oil cooler as a template in order to fabricate the basic shape for the adapter plates. See Illustration 51. Then use the dimensions that are specified in Illustration 52 to complete the fabrication of the adapter plates.

  1. Fabricate two adapter plates with the use of the mounting flanges for the oil cooler as a template for the outline. See Illustration 51 and callout (H).

  2. Drill three equally spaced holes with the centers for the holes on a diameter of 64 mm (2.52 inch). The three holes should be 12 mm (0.47 inch) in diameter. See callout (J) and callout (K).

  3. Machine the groove for the O-ring. See callouts (I), (M), (N) and (O).

  4. Drill a hole that is 14.9123 mm (0.5871 inch) in diameter in the center of one of the fabricated adapter plates with the use of a 1U-7434 drill bit. Tap the hole with a 2P-5533 tap for the 4C-7159 Fitting. See callout (L).

    Note: One of the fabricated adapter plates should not include the drilled hole and the tapped hole.

  5. Apply 5P-3413 Pipe Sealant to the threads of 4C-7159 Fitting and install the fitting into the cover that has been drilled and tapped. Tighten the fitting to 35 N·m (26 lb ft).

    Note: Use only enough pipe sealant to seal the threads as excessive sealant could contaminate the oil cooler.

  6. Use two 4J-5267 Seal O-ring in order to seal the fabricated adapter plates to the oil cooler.

  7. Proceed to the "Pressure Testing" section.

Table 9
Parts For Pressurizing Oil Coolers
3046 engines 
Part Number  Description  Quantity 
Fabricated  Adapter Plate 
4J-5267  Seal O-ring 
4C-7159  Fitting 
6V-3940  Bolt 
9M-1974  Washer 
2P-5533  3/8 inch NPTF Tap 
1P-3047  Tap Handle 
1U-7434  37/64 inch drill 

Pressure Testing



    Illustration 53g06279987
    Fabricated covers, connection for air pressure and source of air pressure

  1. Install the covers or the fabricated adapter plates to the oil cooler flanges for mounting with the use of the appropriate quantity and style of hardware. Refer to Table 8 and refer to Table 9. Illustration 53 is for reference .

  2. Connect the hose from the 242-7135 Oil Cooler Tester Gp to the fitting on the fabricated cover.

  3. Connect regulated shop air supply to the pressure gauge and valve assembly and pressurize the oil cooler to 690 to 760 kPa (100 to 110 psi).

  4. Shut off the incoming air pressure and record the static air pressure. See Table 10 as an example of the sheet for recording the oil cooler test results. Verify that the pressure is sustained for a minimum of three minutes. If there is a pressure loss of 2 kPa (0.3 psi) or more indicates that there is a leak within the oil cooler.

    Note: Ensure that there are no leaks in the equipment that is used for pressure checking before the oil cooler is replaced.



    Illustration 54g06279989
    Pressure testing in water

  5. If a leak is indicated from the pressure test, submerge the pressurized oil cooler into a container of clean water that is at ambient temperature. By submerging the oil cooler into a container of clean water, the source of the leak will be able to be confirmed and located.

    Note: Before looking for leaks gently agitate the cooler in the water so naturally occurring air bubbles can dissipate from the surface of the oil cooler.

  6. Maintain the air pressure for at least 10 minutes.

  7. Identify the source of the leak or the source of the leaks.

  8. Record the information. See Table 10 as an example of the sheet for recording the oil cooler test results.

Table 10
Test Results For Oil Coolers 
Number for the Work Order   
Technician's name   
Number that identifies the technician   
Serial number (Engine/Machine/Vehicle)
(Circle one) 
 
Service Meter Units (Hours)   
Part number for the oil cooler   


Illustration 55g06279990

Table 11
Static air pressure   
Pressure loss in 3 minutes   
Source of the leak
(Circle area or areas on the picture) 
 
Results of the Procedure to Test The Cooler For Cleanliness 
Cleanliness of 16/13 ISO with a tolerance of plus 1 ISO level minus 0 ISO level.   


______________________________________
Technician
 


__________________________________________________________
Supervisor
 

How to Repair a Leak

Usually, a leaking tube can be plugged. If more than five tubes need to be plugged or there is damage to the end plates around or between the tubes, do not repair the oil cooler. Extensive can be an indication that the core has been damaged or that internal fatigue has begun. This will cause other tubes to fail later.

Brass Plug Method

Table 12
Diameter  Length 
3.99 mm (0.157 inch)  32.0 mm (1.26 inch) 
4.19 mm (0.165 inch)  32.0 mm (1.26 inch) 
5.41 mm (0.213 inch)  32.0 mm (1.26 inch) 

  1. Install brass plugs in leaking tubes. Refer to the table 12, for making the plugs to the correct size.


    Illustration 56g06280225
    Installation of a brass plug to repair a leaking tube.

  2. Install plugs carefully, using a hammer. Put a small amount of 7M-7456 Bearing Mount Compound on the plug before installation.

  3. Do not plug any more than five of the tubes in the oil cooler core. Plugging too many tubes can reduce the cooling capabilities of the core, which can lead to engine oil overheating in some applications.


    Illustration 57g06280229
    Typical repair of the tubes in the oil cooler core. Do not plug more than five tubes in any engine oil cooler.
    (20) Plugs

  4. Repair leaking tubes after the oil cooler is clean and dry. Always test the oil cooler again after making a repair.

Solder Method

Another method of plugging a tube is to braze or solder both ends of the leaking tubes together. If done carefully, this repair is acceptable. Do not overheat the end plates or loosen the other tubes.



Illustration 58g06280232
Tubes can be brazed or soldered together if the procedure is performed carefully.


Illustration 59g06280237
Typical repair of tubes performed by brazing.

Quality Control

Ways to monitor the quality of the processes used to clean oil coolers include disassembly or cleanliness and patch testing.

Disassembly

Oil coolers that cannot be reused can still serve a useful purpose. Oil coolers with physical damage or bad leaks can be cleaned and cut apart to view the effectiveness of the cleanliness process.

Cut the coolers with the hack saw between the first baffle plate and the end plate (the plate that is visible). A cut at this location will minimize the amount of cast iron and copper saw shavings that get inside the cooler.

Cleanliness Patch Test

The cleanliness patch test will require a small investment in equipment, but is the quickest and most accurate method of tracking cleanliness quality control. This method can be used on every oil cooler BEFORE installation. The cleanliness patch test is also used to test newly manufactured oil coolers.

Engine bearings, the crankshaft, and other mechanical components are so precisely machined that oil contamination must be carefully controlled. The cleanliness patch test is an easy way to monitor the effectiveness of oil cooler cleaning.

This procedure is for a standard test method that can be used to determine the cleanliness of oil coolers. Use this procedure as a guide to determine contamination and the size of metallic particles acceptable in the oil cooler.

A patch test for metal particle contamination allows visual inspection of the filter for debris. Insoluble matter stays on the filter surface, staining the patch. The color and intensity of this stain will vary according to the type and amount of contamination present. This method concentrates contaminants so that even small amounts can be detected.

No special skills are needed to perform the patch test. However, the patch test will help evaluate and monitor cleaning capabilities for oil coolers or other similar parts.



Illustration 60g06280241
Equipment needed for patch test. Refer to table 13 for item identification.

Table 13
Equipment Needed For Patch Test 
Callout Number  Description 
21  Milliport stainless steel filter cup XX20-047-20 (optional) 
22  Stand clamps (optional) 
23  Base with screen, gasket, and stopper XX20-047-02 (optional) 
24  Cole Parmer magnifier 3890-00-FG 
25  Graduated polyethylene bottle 850.0 mL (28.9 oz). XX64-03-10 
26  Glass vacuum flask XX10-047-05 
27  Glass overflow flask XX10-047-05 (optional) 
28  Stand and base for filtering (optional) 
29  Vacuum pump 
30  Petrislides 
31  Milliport SCWP04700, [8.0 micron, white, 47 mm (1.9 inch) filters] 
32  Collection tray 
33  Pencil magnet 
34  Forceps 

Required Equipment and Chemicals

The basic equipment for checking oil cooler cleanliness consists of two items:

  1. Millipore XX71-047-011 Fluid Contamination Kit.

    Contents: 115 V vacuum pump, glass filter cup with filtering flash and hose, filtering dispenser, forceps, petri slides, and 47 mm (1.9 in) filters (specify 8M SCW04700 white).

  2. Cole Parmer 3890-00-FG Magnifier, 60X.

    This is an inexpensive hand microscope, with reticle scale.

Other Options and Replacement Parts

There are components that can be purchased separately to improve your filtering system or to use as replacement parts.

  1. Millipore XX15-047-00 all glass filtering apparatus (glass filter cup and vacuum flask).

  2. Millipore XX20-047-20 stainless steel filter cup.

    This is a replacement stainless steel filter cup and vacuum flask for the fluid contamination kit. It is recommended for high usage applications.

    Table 14
    Replacement Parts for XX20-047-29 Filter Cup 
    Description  Catalog Number 
    Base with screen, gasket, and stopper  XX20-047-02 
    Teflon gasket (25/pk)  XX20-047-03 
    Funnel and locking ring  XX20-047-04 
    Nylon lock-wheels and wrench set  XX20-047-07 
    Stainless steel support screen  XX20-047-08 
    #8 Neoprene Stopper, 9.6 mm (0.38 inch) hole (5/pk)  XX20-047-18 
    Locking ring assembly  XX20-047-01 

  3. Millipore XX10-047-05 glass vacuum flask.

  4. Millipore SCW04700 [8.0 micron, white, 47 mm (1.9 inch) filters].

  5. Graduated polyethylene bottle 850.0 mL (28.9 oz). XX64-037-10.

  6. Filtering solvent. Dupont Freon TF fluorocarbon solvent (trichlorotrifluoroethane), or suitable solvent, must be prefiltered before using for testing.

General Requirements

  • Prefilter the solvent to remove any particles that might influence the results of the test. Use a Millipore SCWP04700, 8.0 micron, or equivalent.

  • Do the cleanliness tests in a bright, clean area that is free of airborne dust.

  • Flush the outside of the part and any areas which are not controlled for cleanliness. Discard the solvent after use for flushing. Cleanliness-controlled areas on engine coolers are the internal surfaces or the oil side of the cooler (not inside the copper tubes).

  • Clean the filter cap to remove any particles.

Patch Test Procedure

  1. Pour about 500 mL (17 oz) of filtered, clean solvent into an oil port on the oil cooler.

  2. With a gentle rocking motion, tip the oil cooler back and forth to allow the solvent to flow back and forth 15 to 20 times.

  3. Pour the solvent from the oil cooler into the vacuum filter set-up.

  4. Turn on the vacuum and filter the solution through the dried 8.0 micron filter paper at maximum pull.

  5. As the level of the sample liquid decreases in the funnel, use the spray bottle to direct a fresh spray of clean solvent rinse against the funnel walls. Fill the sample bottle 1/3 full with solvent rinse. Shake well and pour the contents into the funnel along the walls.

  6. Discontinue the vacuum when the liquid level in the funnel falls to the narrow neck. Rinse the funnel surface again to wash any remaining particles into the filter paper.

    Note: Do not let the liquid strike directly on the filter surface because this will cause voids in the patch.

  7. Continue to apply the vacuum until all visible moisture has been removed from the filter paper. Discontinue the vacuum and remove the funnel from the base. If you are using the stainless steel filter cup, turn the aluminum locking ring one quarter revolution counter clock-wise. With smooth-tip forceps, carefully lift the test filter/">filter. Put the filter face up on a clean white 75 x 125 mm (3.0 x 4.9 inch) piece of paper. Let the filter dry in still air.

  8. Measure metallic, slag, abrasive, and rust particles for size, whether they are free or loosely attached. Soft materials like fibers, rubber, or soft plastic are not counted unless unusually large. Soft materials are not normally in engine oil coolers.

    1. Look at all the filter paper with a microscope and gently probe any particle larger than 1.00 mm (0.040 inch) to see if it is solid or breaks up easily. Any particles that break up do not need measured. Measure the remaining solid pieces for specification conformance.

    2. Carefully run a small magnet under the filter paper to see if any of the particles are steel or iron.

    3. Measure the thickness of the larger particles with a micrometer that has good resolution. Use extreme care not to crush the particles. This will give you an incorrect reading.

    4. Record the length, width, quantity, size, and description of the particles.

    5. Put transparent tape over the contaminants and the patch to save for future reference.


Illustration 61g06280246
Typical patch.


Illustration 62g06280252
Maximum particle size.
(W) 2000 microns or 2.00 mm (0.079 inch).
(X) 200 microns or 0.20 mm (0.008 inch).

Storage

Proper protection of the oil cooler from corrosion and contamination is important. Corrosion will start in as little as one hour after the oil cooler has been cleaned.

When the oil cooler will not be inspected and tested for one hour or less the oil cooler should be plugged and individually wrapped in order to prevent contamination, and the oil cooler should be stored in a protected area in order to avoid damage. See Illustration 63.

When the oil cooler will not be inspected and tested in two days or more the oil cooler should be plugged and individually wrapped. The wrapped oil cooler should be placed in a container which is clean and structurally solid. The container should be covered or wrapped in plastic in order to prevent damage and contamination to the oil cooler. See Illustration 64.



Illustration 63g06278538
Example of protection for a component that is stored for a shorter term


Illustration 64g06278539
Example of protection for a component that is stored for a longer term

You can buy parts: .

CTP Caterpillar Glass (9R5515) Aftermarket
$415.70

15 Jul 2019
6400 Hundredths Pounds
CTP Caterpillar Glass (9R5515) Aftermarket

9R5515  
5P9095 Roller Bearing Fits Caterpillar
$81.57

15 Jul 2019
5P9095 Roller Bearing Fits Caterpillar

5P9095  
FridayParts Fuel Pump 349-5327 3495327 for Caterpillar CAT Loader 299C 289C 279C 277C 259B3 256C 246C Engine 3044C C3.4
$79.90

15 Jul 2019
FridayParts Fuel Pump 349-5327 3495327 for Caterpillar CAT Loader 299C 289C 279C 277C 259B3 256C 246C Engine 3044C C3.4

3495327  
Back to top
The names Cat, Caterpillar, John Deere, Komatsu, Volvo, Hitachi, Doosan, JCB, Hyundai or any other original equipment manufacturers are registered trademarks of the respective original equipment manufacturers. All names, descriptions, numbers and symbols are used for reference purposes only.
AVSpare.com is in no way associated with any of the manufacturers we have listed. All manufacturer's names and descriptions are for reference only. CatĀ® and CaterpillarĀ® are registered trademarks of Caterpillar, Inc.